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Norway

Norwegian researchers make strides toward diabetes cure

Researchers in Bergen have transformed skin cells from diabetes patients into insulin producing cells. The goal is to transplant them under the skin of persons with the disease.

Is life in Norway as happy as it’s cracked up to be?

OPINION: As an Australian who worked in Oslo for three years, I found that while freedom, tolerance and happiness are indeed important values there, you can expect to enjoy them only if you’re Norwegian.

Inequality may lead to violence and extremism

While the differences between rich and poor have never been higher across OECD-countries, new research suggests that increased inequality can lead to higher risk of violence, racism, and extremism.

Rusty rivets reveal origin of Icelandic viking ships

Viking ships found in Iceland have decayed and often the only things remaining are the rivets. A group of scientists now believe we can learn a lot from the surviving pieces of iron and have brought them to Norway for examination.

Drugs that didn’t keep their promise

The medicines were called “disease-modifying” because they were supposed to slow down the disease itself. But earlier medications for arthritis didn’t do this. Several of them, however, had dangerous side effects. Why did patients take them anyway?

Why is nobody convicted of genital mutilation in Norway?

All cases of genital mutilation reported from 2005 to 2016 have been dropped. Are police failing to handle these cases adequately?

How inspiring are science festivals?

Norwegian research might not corroborate any effect of science festivals, but the rectors of two prominent Norwegian universities are convinced that the Starmus Festival in Trondheim has inspired future scientists.

Technology revealing the secret life of bats

Using digital technology and radio transmitters, researchers are going to find out where Norwegian bats live their lives.

These are our sleep habits

Norwegian researchers have asked compatriots about their sleep habits. Here are seven findings from their study. Are you in the same groove?

Cancer mystery in Norway

Why does a Norwegian woman have nearly double the risk of colorectal cancer as her female counterparts in nearby Finland? Researchers have no idea.

What will our climate look like in 2050?

Knowing that we have the power to influence global climate is enormously important when trying to imagine what our climate might look like in 2050. To a large degree, it will depend on actions our leaders take now and in the immediate future.