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The basement solves an oxygen puzzle

The Earth’s atmosphere did not become rich in oxygen in a single event, but through a series of episodes spread over hundreds of millions of years.

See early physics instruments

Scientific instruments from the 18th and 19th centuries are now on exhibition in Norway. See photos here.

Full HD and GPS in a camera pill

Cameras ingested in the form of a pill make it possible to examine areas of the stomach and intestines that cannot be reached using traditional equipment.

Less blood clot damage with extra treatment

Roughly half the people who get a serious blood clot in the leg experience lasting damage. A little-used supplementary treatment can help prevent such complications.

Chaotic current warms Norway

The Gulf streams warms Norway and Northern Europe. It is the chaos of the seas that does the trick. The current would deliver far less warmth if the waters flowed smoothly.

Why you always have room for dessert

No matter how stuffed you are after the main course you always have room for a little dessert. Here’s a scientific explanation for the phenomenon some people call the “dessert stomach”.

Children know little about the indigenous Samis

The Norwegian State has taken little initiative toward ensuring that children learn about the Sami people, although it is legally obliged to do so.

A water pulk from the rubbish dump

With a simple water pulk or transporter, children in developing countries could have more time for schooling.

The great reindeer slaughter

Under a thin carpet of sparse mountain vegetation lie the remains of an extensive massacre of animals. The 700-year-old rubbish heaps contain hundreds of thousands of bones.

The Archbishop’s mint

The medieval coin workshop found in Trondheim is the world’s best preserved. Now scientists have reconstructed the entire coin-making process.