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Norway

HIV-specialists in high demand in Zambia

In a country struggling with an extreme HIV epidemic, the University of Zambia is educating neuropsychologists to deal with the huge demand for professionals.

Farmed fish don’t need to eat fish

Fish has traditionally been an important ingredient of feed in aquaculture, now new research shows how farmed rainbow trout can eat feed completely free of fishmeal, while growing fast in good health.

Better prepared for E. coli outbreaks

New methods speed up the process of identifying E. coli bacteria that make people sick. Swift identification may spare lives.

Virus makes good E. coli bad

Some E. coli bacteria are harmless and some are dangerous from the outset. Then some become dangerous when they meet viruses. Scientists search for tools that will reduce this risk.

The basement solves an oxygen puzzle

The Earth’s atmosphere did not become rich in oxygen in a single event, but through a series of episodes spread over hundreds of millions of years.

See early physics instruments

Scientific instruments from the 18th and 19th centuries are now on exhibition in Norway. See photos here.

Full HD and GPS in a camera pill

Cameras ingested in the form of a pill make it possible to examine areas of the stomach and intestines that cannot be reached using traditional equipment.

Less blood clot damage with extra treatment

Roughly half the people who get a serious blood clot in the leg experience lasting damage. A little-used supplementary treatment can help prevent such complications.

Chaotic current warms Norway

The Gulf streams warms Norway and Northern Europe. It is the chaos of the seas that does the trick. The current would deliver far less warmth if the waters flowed smoothly.

Why you always have room for dessert

No matter how stuffed you are after the main course you always have room for a little dessert. Here’s a scientific explanation for the phenomenon some people call the “dessert stomach”.