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Norway

Two-hundred-year old butterflies allow research to take wing

It’s been two centuries since these butterflies have flown in their tropical haunts. But the collection the insects come from played a critical role in establishing the study of entomology in Norway.

Home-based services must be strengthened

The care many adult children provide for their elderly parents interfere with their regular jobs. A new study shows that strengthening home-based services is necessary to avoid that the care-giving efforts of adult children affect their work attendance.

Gender matters in war reporting

Being a journalist in war zones and armed conflicts is becoming increasingly dangerous. Most of the journalists killed in the field are men, but the concern is about the security of their female colleagues.

Flu drugs safe for unborn babies

Pregnant women run a higher risk of getting seriously ill if they catch influenza. A new study shows that new-born infants run no higher risk of harm if their mothers have taken anti-viral medications to ward off flu infections.

Unhealthy waiters make you choose unhealthy food

The waiter’s appearance may determine whether you choose healthy or unhealthy food – without you even being aware of it.

This rock switches colours in an instant

Sodalite deposits are found on South Greenland, Canada, Russia and other countries including Norway, and are famous for their chemical colour tricks.

Air pollution in China: Poor people likely to be worst off

Researchers expect that the rural population and poor migrants in cities will be the hardest hit when it comes to air pollution exposure.

Immigrants help Norwegian companies to think differently

Companies that hire immigrants have more international partnerships and are more innovative, according to researcher.

Eight a day is clearly best for your heart

You’ve heard it a thousand times, that little catchphrase with the magic number encouraging you to eat “five a day” of fruits and vegetables for better health. But it turns out that the real magic number is eight, according to a new comprehensive study,

How to track down your ancestry with DNA

Many can follow their ancestry as far back as 2,000 years.