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Norway

New sensor will make life safer for the elderly

Pressure measurements enable a newly developed fall detector to “observe” falls that current sensors do not register, thus improving safety for older people who live at home.

Technology that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere

You may as well learn the expression “carbon-negative technology”, or Bio-CCS, right away, because it has become a talking point in technological circles.

Physically active individuals cope better with heart attacks

People who exercise regularly tend to be less depressed after a heart attack. Those who don’t work out yet can also find reason for optimism from the research.

Large kindergartens rival small ones

A typical Norwegian day care will have from 30 to 40 children. But newer ones can accommodate up to 500 pre-school kids. Too big? Size is not a decisive indicator of the quality of a kindergarten, according to a recent report.

Few Norwegians drawn into new sharing economy

Many are familiar with the concept of the sharing economy and most have now heard of Airbnb and Uber. But to so far, few Norwegians have shared their homes, cars or other possessions.

Social programs fail to aid at-risk youth

Different support services in Norway operate side by side, but lack of communication prevents youth from getting the help they need.

Depression meds almost doubled in last decade for teenage girls

Far more teenagers are now using medications for mental health disorders than ten years ago, a Norwegian study shows. ADHD medication is more prevalent among boys.

The darker side of workouts

Do you exercise to escape from a depressing daily life? If so, think twice next time before putting on those jogging shoes.

The return of the flatworm

Where does the acoel flatworm belong in the tree of life? Biologists have discussed this question for the last 20 years. Now Norwegian researchers believe they have found the answer.

Gamers gain points in English

It might seem like a lot of bang-bang nonsense to parents, but Swedish and Norwegian teens drawn to action and role-play computer games have been found to progress in English.