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Norway

More breast cancer among women with benign findings

Women who are called in for more testing after mammography and whose results are then OK are more likely than others to develop breast cancer in the subsequent two years. But the absolute risk remains low.

Household cleaners can be as bad as smoking for your lungs

Cleaners who have regularly used cleaning sprays over 20 years were found to have reduced lung function equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes a day over the same period.

Elderly people with dementia need more physical activity

A new study shows that elderly people with dementia who have good balance, muscular strength and mobility are less likely to suffer from depression.

It matters who your mother is, even for fish

OPINION: New research could result in both bigger and better farmed fish.

Public transport poses problems for those with mental disorders

Many of us experience mental disabilities of one kind or another in the course of life. A new study points out problems this can cause for users of public transport services.

Elephants outside the national park are more stressed

The stress levels in elephants living in the areas outside Etosha National Park is higher than in elephants living inside the park.

Humans curb movements of wild animals

But researchers do not think this is necessarily catastrophic. It even makes life easier for a few species.

Researcher concerned: Are parents too focused on their smartphones?

Nina Misvær has five tips for parents: "Be conscious of your mobile phone use when you’re with your baby," she emphasises.

Heart health measured with a simple blood test

Researchers have discovered a new indicator that measures the risk of future heart disease. High levels of this substance, called troponin, can identify people at risk.

The side effects of power and the #metoo movement

Aggressive, obstinate men are more likely to seek power and are often preferred as leaders. The #metoo revolution is pushing to change the way managers behave, but research shows that power changes people — and not always for the best.