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Denmark

Now we can learn more about chemicals in the body

Now it will be much easier to examine the effects of chemical substances on humans, thanks to a new computer model which compares data from all over the world.

Blood test can unveil Alzheimer's

A Danish biotech firm has developed a new test which can detect, from a bog standard blood sample, whether the person concerned has Alzheimer's disease. The test can even reveal the disease in its early stages.

Snakes' eyes could give us super eyesight

A new study of snakes’ eyes will inspire researchers to develop a new type of contact lens that can repair itself as well as provide users with optimal vision

Surgery gives you jetlag

The inner clock of patients who undergo surgery is disrupted in the same way as when flying eastwards over several time zones. This jetlag stresses their already severely tried bodies enough to be life-threatening.

Fast cyclists live longer

It pays to pedal hard when cycling from A to B. Doing so can extend your life by up to five years, say researchers.

Does light really put us in a good mood?

On average, Danes spend all but four hours of their day indoors. But what effect does this really have on their state of mind? The answer is just around the corner.

Global warming won't make plants grow any faster

Climate change will likely not result in increased plant growth as once thought. A new Danish research project shows that future periods of drought will limit growth – and that is bad news for the climate.

Danes locate the source of cholera in Haiti

It was Nepalese soldiers who brought cholera with them to Haiti after the January 2010 earthquake, researchers have established. The ensuing cholera outbreak killed 6,000 people and made 400,000 ill.

That dream screen is just around the corner

A Danish chemist expects the first new super-thin graphene screens to be in stores quite soon. But we may have to wait a few years for computers that use this miracle material.

Uncharted area of the brain discovered

Researchers have unveiled a previously unknown area of the brain, a discovery which could lead to new kinds of psychiatric drugs.