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Exercise affects your genes

Going for a run affects not only our weight and humour – our genes also change when we exercise. Scientists may now be able to develop new treatment methods to reduce the risk of developing diseases in people unable to exercise.

Gorilla genome casts new light on human evolution

Scientists have now managed to map the entire gorilla genome. The findings reveal the most accurate picture so far of the evolution of the great ape.

Diverse herrings are super survivors

New research reveals how herring genes vary with the environment. The discovery could make it easier to protect the herring stock against future challenges such as climate change.

Herbs and berries can preserve meat

Why should the shelf life of meat products be extended by a chemical preservative, nitrite, if nature’s own products, grown ecologically, can be used? Researchers have found eight herbs and berries that can preserve meat – and also offer new flavours.

Trees survived the Ice Age in Scandinavia

The genetic structure of ancient trees suggests that we may have to rethink how life reacts to climate change.

Chickens cause serious infections in humans

Intestinal bacteria from poultry can infect humans and cause urinary tract infections. A new study looks into disease transmission from animals to humans in a world of increasing antibiotic resistance.

Barley gene could help feed the world

Researchers from Carlsberg have identified the gene that makes mutant barley bloom faster than regular barley. The discovery could lead to extra food for the world’s poorest nations.

Leg pain weakens sense of balance

New study could explain why so many elderly people either die or get seriously injured from fall accidents.

Trust creates a welfare state – not vice versa

The Scandinavian welfare model cannot be exported to other countries because the fundamental trust required for such a system to function is unique to the Nordic countries.

Hormone-impairing substances make daughters fat

Pregnant women with high levels of hormone-impairing substances in their blood have a three times higher risk than other women of giving birth to daughters who will be overweight at the age of 20.