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Denmark

Bad news for greedy fishermen

New research in fish genetics makes it possible to determine the exact origin of any particular fish. This could make life difficult for fishermen who cannot stay away from endangered species.

iPad runs quick and flexible robot

Engineering students from Aalborg University have made a handy high-tech robot interactive, so it can be controlled by anyone using an iPad or pressing on the robot.

’Loser monkeys’ have poor immune systems

Macaque monkeys at the bottom of the social hierarchy have weakened immune systems. Social status influences almost 1,000 genes that control the immune system. This could apply to humans too.

Magnetic fridge cuts electricity bill in half

Using magnetism to create a cooling effect requires very little energy. It’s also possible to use water instead of harmful greenhouse gases to transport heat and cold.

Colour secrets revealed in fossilised fish-eye

A Swedish palaeontologist and Danish researchers have now proved that prehistoric fossils still have traces of colouring from the animal’s skin, hair or feathers.

New genetic research highlights influences on children’s development

Two normally occurring variants in hitherto unknown genes influence the size of children’s heads. International research has set new standards for studies in genes’ importance for children’s development.

Still time to save our plants from climate change

Climate change will cause plant species to disappear more slowly than previously thought. While this gives us time to rescue our plant life, it means we may begin to underestimate the effects of global warming.

Your Danish friend may be a witch

Witches in present-day Denmark keep their craft secret – and one in four of them is probably a man.

Animals and bacteria evolve together

Scientists have discovered that bacteria evolve in a similar way to the animals they inhabit. This finding will make it easier to study animal evolution.

Stars in globular clusters form communities

The stars in a globular cluster rarely communicate on a one-to-one basis. Instead, they follow the rules of communities.