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Denmark

Can seaweed burgers and potato mayo feed a growing world population?

The recent ’Food in the Future’ arrangement at Aarhus University offered some examples of what we will be eating in the future, including a seaweed burger and mayonnaise made from potato proteins.

Outsourcing to China doesn’t pay off

Danish companies are barking up the wrong tree when they shift their production to China. There is actually more profit in sending part of the production to expensive countries such as Germany, new study suggests.

Photo gallery: The six styles of Viking art

Vikings decorated their objects with patterns and motifs. Researchers have identified six different styles that formed the fashion in the Viking Age.

What is a dignified life?

The limits for when life is worth living are constantly changing. How long should we actually continue to treat a dementia patient who has lost the ability to speak and remember?

World’s fastest fish continues to impress

The sailfish is not only the world’s fastest swimmer. A new video reveals that its movements during hunting are the quickest ever seen in a marine animal.

Essential migraine mechanism discovered

Scientists have identified a key factor in migraine attacks. The discovery of the mechanism may pave the way for improved migraine drugs.

Professor revolutionises computers with the most random function ever

Computers need to be able to generate random results in order to work. A Danish researcher has now created the most random function in the world.

Do reckless drivers generally take more risks?

New research project aims to find out if reckless drivers are generally more willing to take risks in their lives. If so, we may have overestimated the importance that seat belts and drink driving have on road safety.

Why it’s easy to ignore good arguments

Even the very strongest arguments are not good enough to convince everyone. We need to rid ourselves of our notion of rational and irrational arguments, says researcher whose model will be tested in health campaigns.

Pollen may increase suicide rates

Scientists have established a correlation between pollen count in the air and suicide rates in Denmark.