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Denmark

Can young networkers revolutionise science?

A new generation of scientists is reinventing research in networks that are driven by raw passion. The industry is watching on the sidelines keen to get on the bandwagon.

With exercise, sometimes less is more

Moderately overweight people do not lose more weight by exercising 60 minutes. Shorter exercise sessions make people more active throughout the day, says researcher.

Hummingbirds can fly with almost no oxygen

The hummingbird’s super-fast wing beats are among the most energy-intensive movements in the animal kingdom. Still, the birds can fly 4,000 metres above sea level, where there is very little oxygen. Scientists have now figured out how this is possible.

Less ice in Greenland 3,000 years ago than today

A new method for dating ancient sea shells reveals that the Greenland Ice Sheet was smaller between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago than it is today. The new study also indicates that the inland ice is more robust than previously thought.

New atom accelerator at Aarhus University

A new, highly advanced atom accelerator has just arrived at Aarhus University, Denmark. The new technology will be used on everything from dating human bones to charting the history of the Sun.

Secure computation on confidential data

How can data from multi-party computation be used in a calculation if this data must be confidential? Danish computer scientists have come a step closer to an answer.

When insulators become electronics

A new, superconducting oxide system multiplies the electron mobility in electronic oxide transistors. Benefits include superconducting nanotransistors, self-charging electronic devices and a new type of RAM.

A new path towards quantum computers

The supercomputer of the future operates with quantum bits, but quantum systems are fragile and they degrade easily. Now Danish scientists have managed to turn this degradation into an advantage, making it easier to create the special quantum states required for a quantum computer.

Meal hosts awaken patients’ appetite

A small research project has shown that hospital patients eat more and food waste is reduced when so-called patient meal hosts are used.

Excessive funding for popular research creates science bubble

Research grants are increasingly being awarded to the same few popular research fields. This results in homogenised projects that rarely deliver what they promise. The phenomenon is similar to real estate bubbles, argue two Danish philosophers.