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Global poverty and inequality: is welfare only for the lucky few?

A new research project sets out to investigate what happens when the fight against global poverty and inequality is left to the corporate sector.

New materials will change the world

What will be the next big thing in materials science? A group of researchers will discuss that during the ESOF2014 conference in Copenhagen.

Increased hormone levels in the womb linked to autism

Autistic boys were exposed to an increased level of male sex hormones before they were born, researchers discover.

Mystery solved: why a Turkish family walks on all fours

A Turkish family suffers from a rare disorder that forces them to walk on all fours. Danish scientists have discovered how the disease works and at the same time solved a long-standing scientific mystery.

Were the Vikings scared of volcanoes?

New Danish research suggests that the Icelandic Vikings were far less relaxed about volcanoes than previously believed.

Research points to personality's effect on our health

Angry and hostile people are more prone to cardiovascular disease than others, while anxious and depressive types have a high risk of developing dementia. Studying the connection between personality and illnesses is a hot topic among scientists.

"I write history in the form of a detective novel"

What's important to keep in mind when you communicate your science? A Q&A with Professor Londa Schiebinger who specializes in the history of science.

Danish researchers bust popular 'fat myth'

There is no 'obesity paradox' for stroke, study finds.

Cynical people are more likely to develop dementia

People with a cynical and suspicious attitude towards others develop dementia more often than other people.

Fat makes pigs more social and less aggressive

A high-fat diet changes social behaviour, reveals new study. This should be considered when advising the public on nutrition, say researchers.

Herpes causes fatal tumours in sea turtles

The herpes virus has long been thought to cause sea turtles to develop fatal tumours. Although the number of the world’s sea turtles developing tumours has been decreasing since the 90s, a new study shows this doesn’t mean that turtles are rid of herpes.