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World’s oldest fossils discovered in Greenland

GREENLAND: Scientists have discovered bacterial structures in 3.7 billion year-old rocks in Greenland, indicating that life began earlier than previously thought.

Exercise in the morning and sleep better at night

If you find it difficult to fall asleep in the evening then you may want to consider switching your evening run to the morning, say scientists.

New theory explains how metals melt and freeze

Physicists have discovered how the melting process works at extreme pressures such as those found inside the Earth’s core.

Big data: necessary but insufficient to understand the brain

OPINION: Neuroscientists should select the data they need, rather than collecting more and more big data, says brain scientist Florian Engert in an interview with ScienceNordic.

Viking horse breeders developed the ‘ambling gait’

New research shows that we probably have the Vikings to thank for modern horse riding's most comfortable riding style--the ambling gait.

New Viking graves discovered in Denmark

A new archaeological excavation in Denmark reveals the remains of graves and buildings that span the Stone Age, Bronze Age, the Vikings, and right up to the Middle Ages.

Scientists need your help to build a quantum computer

If you have always dreamed of helping out with a quantum physics experiment, now is you chance. And all you need to do is play a video game.

15 weeks of high-intensity swimming can help prevent diabetes

Short bursts of high-intensity swimming prevents type 2 diabetes in middle-aged women, shows new research.

Scientist will decode neuron messages to treat pain

A new Ph.D. project will try to decode the scrambled messages from damaged nerve cells and develop new treatments to combat neuropathic pain.

Human-induced global warming began 180 years ago

An international team of scientists have detected a warming signal in some parts of the globe from as early as the 1830s.

How to avoid insulting co-workers in other countries

Irritation, frustration and misunderstandings can arise when employees in Norwegian companies communicate with colleagues abroad. Poor English can cause more confusion than cultural differences, according to a Norwegian researcher.