Syndicate content

Denmark

God's own weapons: Danish foreign fighters tell why they are fighting for jihad

A Danish scientist has followed six Danish foreign fighters to try to understand, what makes people leave security and safety in Denmark to go to war in the Middle East.

No link between MMR vaccine and autism

Another study confirms that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella does not lead to autism.

Professors with advice to inactive people: Football is good for your health

But if you want to play football rather than taking medicine, the advice is that you will need to keep playing and only do it after consulting with your doctor.

Linguists need preservation of languages to study human language

Indigenous languages can tell us a lot about humanity. But as we are advancing our knowledge, languages are dying out rapidly.

Are all cancer cells the same?

Not necessarily. And being able to identify the differences at a genetic level could lead to more effective, personalised treatments.

2019 is UN’s International Year of Indigenous Languages. And we need it to be

Linguists warn against the death of half the world’s languages by the end of this century.

Does your ‘private’ data picture meet the beauty standards of society?

COMMENT: Private companies and public sectors collect our data every day and minute. In a democratic society, we need to teach children to become critically aware and understand how data processing and digital technologies really work.

Damsel in distress or sexy sidekick? The representation of women in video games has changed

The representation of women in video games has been under debate, and this may have caused more nuanced female characters.

Danish children are reaching puberty earlier

A new study shows that Danish children start puberty earlier than their parents did.

We desperately need to store more carbon – seagrass could be the answer

Seagrass plants have an excellent capacity for taking up and storing carbon in the oxygen-depleted seabed, where it decomposes much slower than on land. This oxygen-free sediment traps the carbon in the dead plant material which may then remain buried for hundreds of years.