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Cars and traffic

Driverless busses coming to a street near you

Tests are underway in Stavanger, but new laws have to be drafted and passed before self-driving busses can actually take to the streets. The Norwegian Government will probably give them the green light this year.

Speed warning system saves lives and reduces emissions

Using a speed warning system in Norway could reduce both the average speed of vehicles and their emissions, concludes a recent report. Lower speeds also lead to fewer fatalities and serious injuries on the roads.

How cars have transformed China

China has become both the world’s largest car market and the world’s largest producer of cars and vehicles. New vehicle sales in China have now surpassed those in the US.

Safer with or without a steering wheel in autonomous vehicles?

Taking manual control in critical situations in dangerous. The car has to win passengers' confidence, say Norwegian researchers.

Finding predictability in car brand loyalty

Car brand loyalty involves more than customer satisfaction, it turns out. A new study examines the past purchases of 9000 Norwegian car owners for buying patterns.

Driving home from night shifts is risky

Graveyard shift workers are not only subjected to higher risks of health problems – they can pose an immediate threat to themselves and others when heading home for bed.

Guardrails with inbuilt noise-barriers are on the way

A combined solution offers better protection against traffic noise – and can also benefit two-wheeled road-users.

Why whiplash becomes chronic for some

Some patients are more likely to suffer long-term whiplash pain and complications than others.

Making cycling safer for cyclists and drivers

Bicyclists, especially those who commute to work, are neither fish nor fowl: they can ride on the sidewalk, or ride in the road and take their chances with cars. How safely they ride is partly linked to how their peers see safety.

Urban planners have little sway on lowering use of cars

Environmentally friendly cities with densely populated downtown centres offering a comprehensive array of services are not what changes people’s use of cars; the key lies with the residents themselves.