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Cancer

More colorectal cancer in Norway than elsewhere in Europe


While fewer Norwegians are dying from colorectal cancer now than twenty years ago, other countries have done a better job in cutting mortality from the disease.

Milk and your health: The jury is still out

Largest study of its kind gives no conclusive answer to the question of whether milk increases the risk of cancer, heart disease, or premature death.

Malaria protein targets and kills cancer cells

New cancer treatment shows promising results in mice and scientists hope to repeat this success in human trials.

Antioxidants doubled spread of cancer in mice and human cells

Scientific opinion on antioxidants shifts, as the ‘anticancer’ wonder turns out to be doing more harm than good.

Enhancing individual treatment for rectal cancer

Intestinal cancer is a common form of the disease in Nordic countries but is hard to treat. Norwegian researchers are trying to tailor treatment better to the individual patient.

The women's cancer nobody talks about

They’re thrown into menopause in their twenties, lose the possibility to have biological children, and struggle with their sex life. But they don't talk about it. For while breast cancer is business, pink ribbons and celebrities - gynecological cancer is still taboo.

Resistance training works well for prostate cancer patients

Men with prostate cancer should be exercising, a new study shows - to combat muscular atrophy and to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

Can noise make you sick?

A new study will examine whether daily exposure to loud noise increases the risk of cancer and diabetes in women.

Family’s hereditary cancer gene found

When almost a third of a hundred members of one family had cancer, or were cured of cancer, researchers began to look for a cancer-causing gene in the family. They found it after fifteen years of genetic testing.

Cancer patients have too much faith in trial drugs

Some of the sickest cancer patients have unrealistic expectations of being cured through trials of new medicines. A Swedish study shows that they often underestimate the risks of participating in a research project.