Syndicate content

Cancer

Exercise boosts recovery after lung cancer surgery

Patients who underwent surgery for lung cancer benefited from exercising shortly after their procedure. With close guidance and a personal trainer many of the patients improved their physical fitness level beyond their starting point.

Bacteria from the sea join the fight against cancer and infections

Norwegian scientists are opening the gates of nature’s secret medicine factories, with the aim of giving us new weapons against cancers and resistant bacteria.

More colorectal cancer in Norway than elsewhere in Europe


While fewer Norwegians are dying from colorectal cancer now than twenty years ago, other countries have done a better job in cutting mortality from the disease.

Milk and your health: The jury is still out

Largest study of its kind gives no conclusive answer to the question of whether milk increases the risk of cancer, heart disease, or premature death.

Malaria protein targets and kills cancer cells

New cancer treatment shows promising results in mice and scientists hope to repeat this success in human trials.

Antioxidants doubled spread of cancer in mice and human cells

Scientific opinion on antioxidants shifts, as the ‘anticancer’ wonder turns out to be doing more harm than good.

Enhancing individual treatment for rectal cancer

Intestinal cancer is a common form of the disease in Nordic countries but is hard to treat. Norwegian researchers are trying to tailor treatment better to the individual patient.

The women's cancer nobody talks about

They’re thrown into menopause in their twenties, lose the possibility to have biological children, and struggle with their sex life. But they don't talk about it. For while breast cancer is business, pink ribbons and celebrities - gynecological cancer is still taboo.

Resistance training works well for prostate cancer patients

Men with prostate cancer should be exercising, a new study shows - to combat muscular atrophy and to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

Can noise make you sick?

A new study will examine whether daily exposure to loud noise increases the risk of cancer and diabetes in women.