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Cancer treatment

Indestructible bacteria threaten cancer patients

Cancer patients may die from infections as antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to spread. The Norwegian Cancer Society is now fighting unnecessary antibiotic use.

Telomeres do not determine your mortality but they protect against cancer

Researchers have found that short telomeres do not lead to increased mortality. Surprisingly, they reduce the risk of dying from cancer.

Supercomputing reveals the genetic code of cancer

Cancer researchers are now using one of the world's fastest computers to detect which parts of the genetic code may cause bowel and prostate cancer.

The nanomedicines of the future will build on quantum chemistry

Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow’s cancer drugs.

Could laser light and nanoparticles replace chemotherapy?

Scientists are investigating the possibility of eliminating malignant tumours using lasers. The collaborative efforts between physicists and doctors is already producing promising results.

Danish scientists deactivate cells to cure cancer

When special cells known as fibroblasts are active, cancer can spread throughout the body. Scientists are trying to find out how they can deactivate the fibroblast cells. In the long term, the studies may lead to treatments for otherwise incurable cancer.

Treating cancer with Botox

Researchers have found a novel approach to treating gastric cancer.

Extreme DNA analysis aids cancer treatment

‘Extreme’ high-resolution DNA analysis reveals the risk of cancer relapse - making treatment more effective.

Protein found that can save colon cancer patients

Patients under treatment for colon cancer who have only a small amount of a certain protein in their tumour are at a high risk of relapse. New information about these tumours can be used in targeted treatment that saves lives.

Digital aids are not helpful for all patients

The health service uses a growing amount of technology for communicating with patients. While this works well for some cancer patients, it can lead to others becoming unduly preoccupied with their illness.