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Cancer

Simulating your cancer treatment on a computer

In ten years, computers will be able to propose the most suitable cancer treatment for you. The idea is to simulate how all possible combinations of existing cancer treatments will work on your particular tumour.

Brain Cancer: Vibrating the brain to find resistant tumours

The current treatment for brain cancer has almost no effect for some people with the disease. Norwegian researchers are now experimenting by using vibrations to find these patients.

Is any part of our body cancer proof?

Who has ever heard of heart or spleen cancer? And what about the appendix?

High levels of vitamin B12 can increase lung cancer risk

High levels of B12 in the blood are linked to 15 per cent increased risk of lung cancer, according to a major international study. That’s one more reason to stop buying supplements and eat a healthy, varied diet, researchers say.

Lifestyle affects cancer risk, but the biggest risk is getting old

Old age is not for the weak of heart: Nine out of ten cases of cancer occur after we reach the age of 50, new numbers from the Norwegian Cancer Registry show.

3D mammography can detect more tumours than conventional techniques

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis produces a three-dimensional image of the breast and can detect 34 per cent more tumours, shows new study.

Treating heartburn can reduce the risk of developing oesophageal cancer

A major Nordic study now confirms that that treating acid reflux and heartburn has benefits beyond relieving these particular conditions.

Tumours are more complicated than previously believed

What was once considered a fundamental principle in understanding how cancer tumours grow has been shown to be wrong.

Cancer survivors find going back to work tough

Regardless of their background and occupation, survivors felt that they started working too soon after finishing treatment. But workplace adaptations can help ease the transition.

Bladder cancer more often fatal for women

Women are diagnosed at a more advanced stage of the disease, when the cancer is more likely to have spread, according to a Norwegian study.