"Art in Science” depicts the microscopic beauty of science

November 13, 2016 - 06:25

The winners of this year’s “Art in Science” photo competition have been announced. See the winning entries in the gallery below.

160 photos of beautiful patterns and shapes from the world of science were submitted to the Art in Science’s (ARTis) annual photographic competition in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Entries have to combine art and science and promote interaction between scientists and the public.

The prize winners were announced in a ceremony at the University of Copenhagen. You can see all of the award winning photographs in the gallery at the top of this article.

In the category of “best photograph,” gold went to “The kiss” by Zoe Anderson-Jenkins, which shows immunofluorescent images of two stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC) coloured in cardiac troponin-T (red) and DAPI.

Silver went to “The lonesome nomad” by Benoît Desbiolles and Valentin Flauraud, which depicts a desert-like landscape but is in fact atomised nano-graphic films.

And bronze went to “Form, function, fabulous” by Kim Nicole Dalby, showing the microscopic structure of graphite.

Other winners: insects, nano-particles, and mushrooms

Amateur photo: 'Spider Web Diffraction' by Svend Erik Westh Hansen, which represents nano-scale structural variations in a spider’s web.

Young ARTscientist: 'Surface tension' by the Danish-French School, depicting a surface tension experiment.

Humour: 'Insect samples are also good for a laugh' by Malene Fogh Bang. A sketch made by scientists studying biodiversity.

Facebook award: 'Magnetic Mandala' by Helena Augusta Lisboa de Oliveira, depicting cracked magnetic nano-particles derived from a dried magnetic fluid.

Culture night audience award: 'Basidiomycota' of Sebastian Alexander Stamatis, represents a collection of woodland mushrooms, used as a key to identify species.

The winning photos will be on display at the University of Copenhagen until the end of November 2016.

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Read the Danish version of this article on Videnskab.dk
 

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Translated by
Catherine Jex

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