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Archaeology

Nordic people drank wine 3,000 years ago

Researchers have found traces of wine in jars, dating back to 1100 BC. The finds suggest that wine was imported long before previously thought.

How archaeology helps wild reindeer

Archaeological finds left by prehistoric hunters offer today's biologists invaluable tools for understanding how reindeer once roamed Norway's landscape - unimpeded by roads, power lines or other infrastructure.

New atom accelerator at Aarhus University

A new, highly advanced atom accelerator has just arrived at Aarhus University, Denmark. The new technology will be used on everything from dating human bones to charting the history of the Sun.

Treasure trove reveals Iron Age town

Västra Vång in Blekinge is now a sleepy rural community on Sweden’s southern Baltic coast. It has never been mentioned in ancient or medieval writings. So why are gold figurines and bronze busts turning up there?

DNA links Native Americans with Europeans

Ancient DNA reveals that the ancestors of modern-day Native Americans had European roots. The discovery sheds new light on European prehistory and also solves old mysteries concerning the colonisation of America.

Huge ancient monument found in Sweden

Archaeologists have discovered a monumental structure with high wooden poles, dated at 400-500 AD in Uppsala, Sweden.

Denmark’s first farmers were immigrants

A new study of flint axes suggests that the first farmers in southern Scandinavia were not Scandinavian hunter-gatherers; they were central European immigrants.

Irish weights were a key Viking Age trading tool

OPINION: Weights played an important role in Viking trading. The weights made it possible to value items and receive the correct payment – and items of huge value were sometimes at stake.

Glacier reveals 5,400-year-old Stone Age arrow

The oldest artefact ever found in a Scandinavian snowdrift glacier has researchers abuzz. “We’ve never seen 5,000-year-old objects melt out of the ice before,” says an archaeologist from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Field teeming with Bronze Age gold rings

Four Bronze Age gold rings were recently found near the site where six similar rings were found in 2009.