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Archaeology

Greenland Vikings outlived climate change for centuries

Climate change didn't kill off the thick-skinned Norsemen.

Exceptional Stone Age Norwegian excavated

An 8,000-year-old human skeleton is now undergoing meticulous analysis. It’s extremely rare for such old human remains to be found in the Nordic countries because much of the region was covered in a crushing sheet of ice until 9,000 - 10,000 years ago.

Mammoth extinction: new study questions comet theory

Did extreme weather changes kill off the woolly mammoths? Scientists continue to disagree.

Roman drunkard found on Danish island

A new archaeological find on the Danish island of Falster can be traced back to the first Roman Emperor, Augustus.

Sacred sites in Southern Lebanon are losing their value

Several sacred sites in Southern Lebanon have been lost as a result of the country’s many conflicts. This has created sharper dividing lines between the various religious groups in the region.

Recreating clothes from the Iron Age

A few years ago, the oldest known piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway, a tunic dating from the Iron Age, was found on a glacier in Breheimen. Now about to be reconstructed using Iron Age textile techniques, it is hoped the tunic will inspire Norwegian fashion designers.

Evidence found: Harald Bluetooth built Viking fortress

A few months ago, the find of a hidden ringfort in Denmark created great excitement among archaeologists all over the world. Now archaeologists have finally concluded that it is, in fact, a Viking fortress. But was it Harald Bluetooth's?

Danish archaeologists find 5,000-year-old human footprints

Archaeologists have discovered footprints from the Stone Age during excavation for the Fehmarn Tunnel. The find tells a dramatic story.

Swedish glass production 300 years older than historians believed

A large lump of glass is shedding new light on the history of glass production in Sweden.

Prehistoric humans were far smarter than previously assumed

325,000-year-old stone tools go to prove that our forefathers were far better at collaborating and planning than we thought.