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Archaeology

Researchers have feared and expected continued destruction in Palmyra

Researchers at the University of Bergen have expected more atrocious vandalism of cultural treasures in the UNESCO World Heritage Site Palmyra by members of the Islamic State, IS. Most of all, they fear that more of their scientific colleagues and friends in areas controlled by IS will be killed.

Norwegian iron helped build Iron-Age Europe

Two thousand years ago, Norway produced iron in significant quantities. Much of it was exported both southward and northward from Trøndelag in central Norway.

See where the Vikings travelled

Use the interactive map to find out where the Vikings travelled to and how they traded and plundered in everything from spices to slaves.

Kennewick Man’s genome suggests Native American ancestry

New genetic evidence turns existing theories on their head and settles a fierce debate over the remains of a prehistoric man once and for all.

Ancient urn hints at global trade network

Archaeologists "couldn't believe their eyes" when a perfectly preserved urn turned up in a grave in Southern Jutland.

History rewritten: Europeans were “born” in the Bronze Age

DNA from 101 Bronze Age skeletons shows that Europeans came from nomadic tribes who invaded during the Bronze Age.

Five massive Bronze Age axes unearthed in Denmark

Archaeologists have made a world-class Bronze Age find on a small field in North Denmark.

A famous Danish Bronze Age icon turns out not to be Danish after all

Analysis of the Egtved girl’s teeth, clothes, hair, and nails, show that the Bronze Age teenager was not born in Denmark.

Did inbreeding and poor health kill the mighty mammoth?

Two mammoths, living 40,000 years apart, could hold the secret genetic history of these mighty creatures.

The Viking age began in Denmark

New study changes our understanding of how and where the Viking age began.