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A big salmon blow-up

New microscope technology can portray your dinner fish in a new light, through a mix of biology, handicraft – and art.

Bad news for greedy fishermen

New research in fish genetics makes it possible to determine the exact origin of any particular fish. This could make life difficult for fishermen who cannot stay away from endangered species.

Climate change makes cod grow

North Sea cod are growing far more than expected. The explanation lies in global warming.

How agriculture came to Scandinavia

The great archaeological riddle of how agriculture spread to Northern Europe now seems to have been solved.

Halibut pierced by mysterious ’projectile parasite’

Researchers have discovered a previously unknown parasite that attacks the Greenland halibut by piercing the fillet. The fish almost looks as if it were shot with a rifle.

Less Salmonella in outdoor and organic herds

A study surprisingly reveals a lower incidence of Salmonella bacteria in outdoor and organic pig herds than in conventional herds.

Diverse herrings are super survivors

New research reveals how herring genes vary with the environment. The discovery could make it easier to protect the herring stock against future challenges such as climate change.

Old spawners important for salmon rivers

Super-veterans among salmon are keys to the survival of river stocks in hard times.

Farmed salmon retains good fats

Norwegian farmed salmon is still a good source of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, even though these fish are now fed more vegetable oils than previously.

Waking plankton from hibernation

They are the motor of the ecosystem in the oceans of the high North. But we don’t know much about where plankton are during the sunless winters or how they waken in spring.

The mysterious Arctic skate

A hundred-kilo barn door with two sharp “penises” glides above the seabed in Norwegian fjords, prowling for a female. Meet the Arctic skate, an ancient and secretive fish.

On the track of the world’s first farmer

The very first farmer may have lived in a barren mountain landscape in Turkey over 10,000 years ago.

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Today's selected stories

Norwegian study links flu vaccine to narcolepsy risk

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health has found an elevated risk of narcolepsy among children and young adults who were vaccinated against the swine flu seven years ago. Some who did not take the vaccine against the pandemic of 2009 also developed this severe sleeping disorder.