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Giant skates almost extinct in Scandinavia

A new study shows that skates, sharks, and sturgeon are the most threatened fish in Europe.

Researchers don’t really know what prevents predator attacks

A review of a host of research papers has failed to find any scientific proof that electric fences are protecting sheep against large predators.

How much more environmentally friendly is it to eat insects?

Insect farms emit 75 per cent less carbon and use half as much water as poultry farms, shows new study.

Come aboard Denmark’s largest research vessel

ScienceNordic was invited aboard research vessel Dana to join its regular expedition in the Baltic Sea.

Why we should use these bacteria in fertilizers

OPINION: A certain type of bacteria can reduce emissions as well as help food production. Scientist Kedir Woliy Jillo explains how.

Ants developed agriculture 50 million years ago

We humans often see ourselves as the pioneers of farming but it is actually ants who led the way, millions of years ahead of us.

Why is China so quiet in negotiations about fisheries in the central Arctic Ocean?

OPINION: Non-Arctic states such as China must be involved in regulatory efforts to achieve sustainable management of fisheries in the Arctic Ocean.

Bio-refineries could reduce imports of environmentally harmful soy

Animal feed mixed with imported soy beans is a drain on the environment. A new report suggests that environment-friendly protein can be produced in bio-refineries.

Can salmon lice end up on your dinner plate?

Are there any parasites on the fish you buy in the store?

How sustainable is organic food?

Organic food seems like it should be good for the environment. But not all Norwegian researchers agree it is sustainable.

Can't agree on harmfulness of GMO maize

A Norwegian study suggested that GMO maize could potentially be harmful to the environment. But the study was dismissed by the European Food Safety Authority, who claimed the study was flawed.

Making retired hens into more than a refuse problem

In Norway over three million retired laying hens are gassed to death and end up as refuse - anually. A group of Norwegian scientists want to put the hens to better use.

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