Scientists uncover how our body fights off blood clots

Our body has its own system to combat blood clots and a team of Danish scientists have found out how it works.

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  • Blood poisoning doubles risk of heart attack and stroke

    Patients with blood poisoning from pneumonia and urinary tract infection have a higher risk of heart attack and stroke than other hospitalised patients.
  • Norway’s constitution in the nick of time

    Norway is the only country in Europe with a constitution that has survived since the ground-breaking years around 1800. It was passed at the tail end of a revolutionary era, two centuries ago this year.
  • Mutant gene protects against type 2 diabetes

    Scientists have identified genetic mutations that lower the risk of type 2 diabetes by 65 percent. Pharmaceutical companies are already looking for ways to develop a drug based on the new discovery.
  • Older women want their wine

    You can forget about arsenic and old lace. Menthol drops and butter toffees too. In the near future the favoured transgressions of old ladies will be along the line of merlots and pinot blancs. A new generation of elderly tipplers is slogging its way toward assisted living facilities.
  • Map outlines global hotpots of bycatch intensity

    Fishery bycatch poses a great threat to various endangered species, and to ecosystems in general. Scientists have now mapped out the problem.
  • Big stores enhance small ones

    Lower prices and more jobs. The openings of giant retail establishments, or “big-box” stores as they are often called, have a surprisingly positive effect on a local economy.
  • Metabolism works differently than we thought

    Kleiber’s law of metabolism, which states that the metabolic rate of an animal scales to the 3/4 power of the mass, has a flaw in it, argues Danish scientist.
  • Workplace noise does not make you sick

    The largest ever study of occupational noise surprises by failing to establish a correlation between noise and cardiovascular disease. This contradicts previous findings, which show that noise increases the risk of high blood pressure, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases.
  • Farmed salmon are as fertile as wild salmon

    The sperm from farmed male salmon are just as likely as the sperm of wild salmon to succeed in fertilising wild salmon eggs, experiments have shown. Researchers recommend that farmed salmon be made sterile.
  • Screening does not prevent aggressive breast cancer

    Breast screening does not detect the types of breast cancer that women actually die from sufficiently early, new research reveals. Screening may even lead to overtreatment, which increases the risk of other cancers, argues researcher.

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