Salvaged donor lungs can save lives

Donor lungs once thought unsuitable for transplant can be salvaged for use by a new method after special treatment in a purpose-built heart and lung machine unit.

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  • Vitamin D-fortified food helps us through dark winters

    Milk and bread fortified with vitamin D increases vitamin D levels in an average Danish family. This may help the ten percent of Danes who suffer from vitamin D deficiency in winter, say researchers.
  • Infants from immigrant group at risk

    Stillbirths and infant deaths occur twice as often among the offspring of ethnic Pakistani couples in Norway than in ethnic Norwegians.
  • Untested chemicals damage children’s brains

    The number of industrial chemicals with a proven neurotoxicity effect on children’s brains has doubled since 2006. Meanwhile, the number of children with developmental disorders such as autism and ADHD is on a rise. Scientists are raising the alarm.
  • MRIs can’t detect every prostate cancer

    Every year around 5,000 Norwegian men are diagnosed with prostate cancer. A new diagnostic procedure using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is in use, but to date it is too unreliable to use on its own.
  • Schizophrenics more likely to get autoimmune diseases

    Schizophrenic people have a greater risk of developing diseases such as psoriasis, diabetes and MS than the general population. Infections appear to play a central role in the explanation, new study suggests.
  • More fish found deeper in the ocean

    The amount of fish in the world is being reassessed upwards. Some ten billion tonnes of fish that live at depths down to a kilometre are not fished at all. A University of Bergen professor thinks this biomass will be much more important for humankind in the future.
  • Photochemicals brighten hopes in bile duct cancer treatment

    A Norwegian technology for delivering cancer-fighting medications to targeted parts of the body is showing promising results. The technology has been used on cancers in the head and neck region and will now be tried out on cancer of the bile duct.
  • DIY kit makes building robots easy

    A new do-it-yourself kit makes it much easier to build robots. The kit will help researchers develop and refine human-like walking robots, say the inventors.
  • Acute family stress can impact a child’s immune system

    High levels of stress in a family can undermine a child’s immune system, making it easier for viruses and bacteria to do their worst.
  • Why do headless chickens run?

    The brain does not control all body movements. Some movements are to a great extent controlled by neural networks in the spinal cord. This is why a chicken can run away after you chop its head off. A new study takes a closer look at this strange phenomenon.

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