Explore 200 years of climate change in Denmark, Greenland, and the Faeroes

DATA: Each year DMI updates their historical collection of climate data, which is available to download free. Here are some of the highlights.

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  • Pictures from Amundsen’s South Pole adventures

    Fascinating photos reveal the harsh but beautiful surroundings of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen’s 100-year-old expedition to the South Pole.
  • How Rudolph keeps his cool

    How would you like to go for a run wearing a thick winter fur? Reindeer regulate heat by sticking their tongues out and re-directing their bloodstream.
  • What gives a Xmas song the X factor?

    White Christmas, Blue Christmas, Last Christmas ... it's the same Christmas songs that you hear endlessly repeated on the radio and in shopping malls every year. But what is it that makes these songs so enduringly popular?
  • Few opt for caesareans

    Norwegian women are not too posh to push. Most wish to give birth vaginally. Those who request caesarean sections have good reasons to do so.
  • Historically large glacier losses in 2000s

    The sharp reduction of a Greenlandic glacier in the 2000s was historically large and was caused by short-term climate changes, new research reveals. It also shows the first definite link between climate change and glacial melting.
  • Unmarried couples are no worse off psychologically

    The mental health of Norwegian cohabitants is equal to that of married couples. This contrasts with US research that indicates that such partners tend to be more depressed.
  • Malaria vaccine offers hope for women in Africa

    A team of medical parasitologists has reconstructed a vital part of a malaria protein. The breakthrough has led to a promising prototype vaccine for maternal malaria.
  • Humble therapists get better results

    A therapist's personal traits have a strong effect on the treatment. A humble therapist will be more sensitive to the patient.
  • Enter the eco-cow

    Preparations have started on the breeding of a more climate-friendly cow which calves less frequently and produces milk over a longer period.
  • Why you always have room for dessert

    No matter how stuffed you are after the main course you always have room for a little dessert. Here’s a scientific explanation for the phenomenon some people call the “dessert stomach”.

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