Is life in Norway as happy as it’s cracked up to be?

OPINION: As an Australian who worked in Oslo for three years, I found that while freedom, tolerance and happiness are indeed important values there, you can expect to enjoy them only if you’re Norwegian.

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  • Brains like glaciers

    When a glacier calves into the ocean scientists see the same patterns that are found in brain impulses and other complex, unpredictable systems.
  • Male circumcision leads to a bad sex life

    Circumcised men have more difficulties reaching orgasm, and their female partners experience more vaginal pains and an inferior sex life, a new study shows.
  • Air-traffic shutdown justified

    Last year’s closing of flight zones due to the eruption of Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull was justified, considering the potential damage from the ash, a new study concludes.
  • Simulations can foresee cerebral haemorrhage

    Newly developed simulations are able tell us whether or not a brain aneurism needs to be treated. The lethal bulges can soon be discovered by listening to the eye.
  • Warm sea currents caused the melting of Greenland’s ice

    It was the sea temperature, rather than the air temperature, that determined how fast Greenland’s ice cap melted at the end of the last ice age. This discovery is important for today's research into ice melt
  • The Christians beneath the cathedral

    The Norwegian city Stavanger’s known history commences with the building of its cathedral nearly 900 years ago. Recent analyses of skeletons indicate that several generations of Christians lived there prior to that.
  • Putting a face on a secret of war

    “Don’t worry too much darling if you don’t hear from me for a couple of weeks or so,” wrote Bill Bray the day before he left on Operation Freshman. Families fought for years to find out what had happened to their sons and husbands.
  • The secret life of the sea

    The ocean is teeming with tiny, exquisite creatures that have concealed themselves in certain ways from scientists. Now, 200 years after the organisms were discovered, Norwegian researchers have started to clear up mysteries from the DNA of radiolarians.
  • Dreaded fish disease stamped out in Denmark

    Researchers have successfully stamped out the fish disease VHS in Denmark. Their methods will now be used in other countries.
  • A chapter of oil history

    An engineering model of a 1970s oil platform can still be fascinating. Digital 3D software has long since replaced intricate scale models like this.