What makes the climate change? Part two

Dig deeper into the geological past to learn more about the large swings in climate throughout the Earth’s history.

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  • Self-harm is not only for troubled teens

    Self-inflicted cuts and burns have become such a widespread phenomenon that ordinary, otherwise well-balanced young people have started doing it. The problem is seen in both sexes to an equal degree.
  • The mysterious Arctic skate

    A hundred-kilo barn door with two sharp “penises” glides above the seabed in Norwegian fjords, prowling for a female. Meet the Arctic skate, an ancient and secretive fish.
  • School screening tests misused

    Screening tests designed to spot pupils who need extra assistance in reading, are used to rank schools. Also pupils are trained specifically for the tests to maximise their scores, claims Norwegian reading expert.
  • China has inspired us since Enlightenment

    Europe and the USA are stagnating economically, while China thunders ahead. Can we learn anything from China? New research shows the West has been inspired by China since the Age of Enlightenment.
  • Double standards for the internet hurt users

    Western politicians praise the internet as a tool in the fight against authoritarian regimes – so why do they limit access to the web by registering users and censoring content?
  • What’s the deal with morning breath?

    While you sleep the bacteria in your mouth are forced onto a low-carb diet. They protest by gassing your breath with sulphur.
  • Baby cries shorten our reaction time

    The sound of a baby crying motivates our brain’s alertness and sharpens our ability to react with highly accurate movements. The sound of a woman crying does not have the same effect.
  • Nuts good for fighting obesity and diabetes

    Special amino acids in nuts reduce obesity and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, shows new research which can lead to dietary pills.
  • Microbe masters

    Viruses, bacteria and parasites make us sneeze, poop or scratch our behinds. Can they also be behind some of the world’s major cultural differences?
  • Measuring the fear of immigrants

    In many European countries there are negative attitudes towards immigrants, which may be due to fear. Now a team of researchers have developed a tool to measure xenophobia.

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