Working night shifts is unlikely to increase risk of breast cancer

New study shows that working night shifts for a short period does not increase the risk of developing breast cancer.

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  • Why do men grow bald?

    Why do men - and not women - lose their hair?. Scientists have the answers and some advice too.
  • New European genome HQ to create genome atlas

    The opening of a new international genome research centre in Copenhagen marks the kick-off to an ambitious research project, which could lead to a cancer vaccine.
  • Mobile taggers

    Somebody is tagging. Not with spray-paint, mind you, but with microchips. Cell phones are learning to listen, talk and pay at a short distance.
  • Zebra stripe mystery solved

    It’s been unclear up to now why zebras are striped, but now a team of Swedish and Hungarian researchers claim to have solved the mystery.
  • Teens are major yellow staph carriers

    Seven out of ten 15- and 16-year-olds in two municipalities in Northern Norway are long-term carriers of yellow staphylococci in their throats and about half carry the bacteria in their nasal passages.
  • Fish oil helps pigs through operations

    Tests with pigs show that a diet rich in fish oil improves recovery after operations. The same positive effects could apply to humans too.
  • Geriatric gaming

    Old people are saying “Yes Wii can” and have fun staying in shape with video games. Scientists now want to give them an array of suitable games.
  • A single protein controls our metabolism

    A certain type of cell in our body controls our metabolism and helps decide whether we are hungry or not. This could lead to a drug for controlling obesity.
  • Waking plankton from hibernation

    They are the motor of the ecosystem in the oceans of the high North. But we don’t know much about where plankton are during the sunless winters or how they waken in spring.
  • Tapeworm parasites in the brain give epilepsy

    Traces of pork tapeworm that end up in the human brain can cause epilepsy, but both the parasite and its complications in the form of disease can be fought.

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