Gigantic DNA-study reveals the rise and downfall of prehistoric Eskimos

In the largest study of ancient DNA from the Arctic, Danish scientists have mapped the story of the prehistoric people who lived in one of the harshest areas of the world.

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  • Big stores enhance small ones

    Lower prices and more jobs. The openings of giant retail establishments, or “big-box” stores as they are often called, have a surprisingly positive effect on a local economy.
  • Metabolism works differently than we thought

    Kleiber’s law of metabolism, which states that the metabolic rate of an animal scales to the 3/4 power of the mass, has a flaw in it, argues Danish scientist.
  • Workplace noise does not make you sick

    The largest ever study of occupational noise surprises by failing to establish a correlation between noise and cardiovascular disease. This contradicts previous findings, which show that noise increases the risk of high blood pressure, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases.
  • Farmed salmon are as fertile as wild salmon

    The sperm from farmed male salmon are just as likely as the sperm of wild salmon to succeed in fertilising wild salmon eggs, experiments have shown. Researchers recommend that farmed salmon be made sterile.
  • Screening does not prevent aggressive breast cancer

    Breast screening does not detect the types of breast cancer that women actually die from sufficiently early, new research reveals. Screening may even lead to overtreatment, which increases the risk of other cancers, argues researcher.
  • Print shops search for a survival scheme

    As printed news media lose their readers, printing plants need to find alternative sources of income. Technology places strong limits on their options.
  • Researchers slam plans to criminalise sex work

    Twenty-six Danish researchers have signed a protest letter against the European Parliament’s recommendations to criminalise sex work. Politicians ignore most of the research in this field, they argue.
  • Born underweight – infertile in adulthood

    Girls who were small or underweight at birth have twice the risk of infertility in adulthood as girls who were born within a normal weight range.
  • Islam researcher wins the Holberg Prize

    The British historian Michael Cook has been awarded the Holberg Prize 2014 for his contributions to the understanding of Islam’s early stages and expansion, as well as the religion’s ethical and political thinking.
  • Nose filter keeps out pollen

    Good news for people with pollen allergy: a new nose filter, which can trap pollen particles before they reach the nasal mucosa, can significantly reduce hay fever symptoms.

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